Lanzarote

Canary Islands

Lanzarote

Although the rest of the islands that make up the Canary archipelago do not have much to envy Lanzarote in that sense, the easternmost of them all is also known by the nickname of ‘The island of the volcanoes’. Volcanic activity was very intense in Lanzarote at the beginning of the 18th century, conserving from that time an ashy layer that extends throughout its 846 km².

The combination of those earthy tones and textures with the undulating blue of the Atlantic is one of the first rewards that the traveler’s eyes meet when they arrive in Lanzarote. From here, many more await you.

Its subtropical climate with little rainfall, endows the island with mild temperatures and benign atmospheric conditions that remain with little variation throughout the year. So what is the best time to visit Lanzarote? Any. All times are good.

As if it were not enough with it alone, Lanzarote also has its own archipelago within the Canary archipelago. Completed by La Graciosa and the depopulated islets of Alegranza, Montaña Clara, Roque del Este and Roque del Oeste, which make up the Chinijo archipelago and the largest marine reserve in the European Union with 700 km².

Lanzarote natural areas
But not only the Chinijo archipelago lives the island. Among its innumerable natural spaces, it is also worth highlighting:

Charco de los Clicos
A lagoon inside the crater of a volcano? A green lagoon above? It is not possible, it cannot be. If it is. Yes in Lanzarote. The greenish hue is caused by the algae that live in its waters.

La Geria
Like something out of a science fiction movie, fruit trees and vines are grown in conical holes throughout this area of ​​dark soil. Under the terrain, there is another unmissable claim; Los Naturalistas cave, 1600 km long.

Timanfaya National Park
5000 hectares of Martian landscape, reddish and practically untouched by human influence that have become one of the symbols of Lanzarote and a space protected by Unesco.

Los Ajaches
The paradise of any hiker, an Eden for geologists due to the millions of years written on its rocks. Los Ajaches is a large volcanic structure that occupies the entire south of the island. It is also its oldest region.

The volcanoes
Between Timanfaya and La Geria there is a natural park (another one) whose surface is the product of lava and the peculiar configurations that it once adopted when solidifying. Home of native birds and reptiles.

The crown
Thousands of years contemplate the visitor from 600 meters of height of the monumental Corona volcano, declared a natural park in 1987 and turned into a natural monument in 1994.

Activities in Lanzarote
Lanzarote offers as many possibilities as the types of visitors that come to the island every year, every season.

For the most intrepid and sporty people, its coasts are known throughout the world by surfers who are looking for strong emotions riding the wave, but also by more inexperienced ones who want to continue improving their technique. There are beaches for all levels.

Offshore, the transparency of the waters and the mild climate throughout the year allows diving at a level difficult to match in other areas of the planet, with 100 dive sites.

For those who seek tranquility and disconnect from daily obligations, Lanzarote is also a haven of peace. A good example of this are the Papagayo beaches, a kilometer and a half of coastline in which the finest sand gives way to a calm sea in which different shades of green and blue are mixed. And when relaxation has been enough, a trip on a catamaran or boat, a game of paddles on the sand or the most relaxed recreational sea fishing, can put the perfect finishing touch to an unforgettable day.

The options are almost limitless. From paragliding over Lanzarote to kicking the island from end to end discovering all its volcanic splendor, passing through the possibility of seeing wild dolphins in their natural environment and stopping off on an exhilarating jet ski ride. From a buggy tour to a kayak outing. From a bike route to an underwater visit to the surprising Atlantic Museum.

Culture and gastronomy
The millenary culture of Lanzarote has been developing greatly influenced by its characteristic environment and its, also characteristics, climatic conditions. In addition to the different settlers who have inhabited the island.

Lanzarote presents a challenging territory to prosper and develop, in such a way that its inhabitants have always had to use inventiveness and creativity to make a living through agriculture, fishing, livestock or crafts. These innovative practices, adapted to the circumstances, have given rise to the most special customs, practices and products, unique and without replication anywhere else.

All this is clearly evident in its gastronomy. Wrinkled potatoes, various varieties of cheese, the typical mojo (with coriander or paprika, green or picón) or gofio, the most distinctive food of Canarian food and that was already consumed in pre-Hispanic times, based on toasted cereal flour, for general rule of thumb wheat or corn.

We cannot forget fish, which, being Lanzarote an island, is, as one might imagine, one of the most widely used raw materials in its cuisine. Sama, tuna, hake, grouper, cherne, corvina, old woman, moray eel. Fried, roasted, cooked, sautéed. Stewed in sancocho.

Regarding meats, goat meat is more popular than pork (including that of the Canarian black pig, a native breed of the archipelago) and on Lanzarote wines it would be possible to write hundreds of pages, but perhaps it is interesting to highlight the volcanic malvasia wine due to its exclusive origin and the effect it has on it.

For dessert, of course, bienmesabe. Sweet made with almonds, egg, sugar and lemon.

Enjoy your meal.